Trail Map

Trail Map

The Nature Preserve has about 1.5 miles of trails through the grasslands, oak savanna, and by the wetlands. The riparian area bordering Cache Creek has been maintained in a natural state with willows and cottonwood trees shading the trail that winds along the southern edge of the preserve. Copies of the trail map are available at the Cache Creek Conservancy's office at the Nature Preserve.


Please stay on the trails, for your safety and the wellbeing of the plants and animals at the CCNP

Download a copy of the trail map

Restore Restory Audio Tour and Map

Restore/Restory

 The Restore/Restory project has been completed, and now the public can enjoy the results of this endeavor that depicts “a people’s history of the Cache Creek Nature Preserve.” People are invited to visit the Preserve and experience the audio tour that was one of the goals of this project. The audio tour features recordings done by five different people each focusing on a selected topic. There are six stops on the tour, and each speaker gives a short, three-minute discussion at each stop. Topics include Native Americans, the Californios, farming, gravel mining, and ecology.   

Audio Tour

Stop by the Visitor Center or the administration building to check out a simple-to-operate audio device and wander along the path to the various stops on the tour. The trail is marked and seating is provided at each stop. Sit and listen to one or all of the stories at that stop and move on at your leisure. We hope that you will come out and experience this new learning opportunity at the Nature Preserve.

Audio Tour Information and Map 

 Restore/Restory is a public history project that documents the changing cultural, economic, and physical landscape of the land that is now the Nature Preserve. A collaboration between the UC Davis Art of Regional Change program and the Cache Creek Conservancy, Restore/Restory bought students, scholars and artists together with a diverse cross-section of Yolo County residents to gather photos, audio recordings, and historical research to tell the story of the Preserve. Much thanks goes to jesikah maria ross, director of this project, for producing this history. More information on the Restore/Restory project can be found at www.restorerestory.org